The Live CD Online

We are happy to offer some special notes on all of the songs on the LIVE CD. Some of the text will be identical to that found on the CD, while there are special comments and further information added--and, of course, lyrics so that you can sing along!. We hope you will enjoy this companion to your CD purchase. There are additional external links to other sites offering lyrics source3s and guitar chords and tabulature for your enjoyment.

liner notes

Brian introduces The Margot Evans as a Nova Scotia sea song...he was confused...it's a sea shanty from the 1820's and the steam and sailing packet clippers that ran from New York to Liverpool. The "bullgine" was dockside vernacular for a steam engine.
Just a Sample Image

There are two main kinds of shanties. First are the
work shanties that are divided into short drag
(short haul), long drag (halyard), windlass, and
capstan songs. Second are the forecastle or
fo'c'sle shanties. These are often ballads or tell of
some historical event, and take their name from the part
of the ship where the singing usually took place,
the forecastle, which was the crew's quarters.

Short Drag Shanty
Short drag or short haul shanties were for tasks that required quick pulls over a relatively short time, such as shortening or unfurling sails. When working in rough weather these songs kept the sailors in a rhythm that got the job done safely and efficiently.

Long Drag Shanty
Long drag or halyard shanties were for work that required more setup time between pulls. It was used for heavy labour that went on for a long time, for example, raising or lowering a heavy sail. This type of shanty gave the sailors a rest in between the hauls, a chance to get a breath and a better grip, and coordinated their efforts to make the most of the group's strength for the next pull. This type of shanty usually has a chorus at the end of each line.

Capstan Shanty
Capstan (or windlass) shanties were used for long or repetitive tasks that simply need a sustained rhythm. Raising or lowering the anchor by winding up the heavy anchor chain was their prime use. This winding was done by walking round and round pushing at the capstan bars, a long and continuous effort. These are the most developed of the work shanties.

Forecastle Shanties
In the evening, when the work was done, it was time to relax. Singing was a favored method of entertainment. These songs came from places visited, reminding the sailors of home or foreign lands. Naturally the sailors loved to sing songs of love, adventure, pathos, famous men, and battles. Of course after all the hard work just plain funny songs topped their list.

 

The Margot Evans
(Let the Bullgine Run)

Oh, the smartest clipper you can find,
A-hey, a-ho, are you 'most done?
Is the Margot Evans of the Blue Cross Line,
So clear away the track, and let the bullgine run!

Give me hey rig-a-jig in a low back car,
A-hey, a-ho, are you ‘most done? :Chorus
With Liza Lee all on my knee,
So clear away the track, and Let the Bullgine Run!

Oh, the Margot Evans of the Blue Cross line,
A-hey, a-ho, are you ‘most done?
She's never a day behind her time.
So clear away the track, and Let the Bullgine Run!

Oh, we’re outward bound for New York town,
A-hey, a-ho, are you ‘most done?
We’ll waltz those Bowery girls around!
So clear away the track, and Let the Bullgine Run!

We stowed our freight at the West Street Pier,
A-hey, a-ho, are you ‘most done?
We’ll be homeward bound for some Liverpool beer,
So clear away the track, and Let the Bullgine Run!

When we all gets back to Liverpool town,
A-hey, a-ho, are you ‘most done?
I’ll stand ‘ya whiskies all around!
So clear away the track, and Let the Bullgine Run!

Oh, when I come home across the sea,
A-hey, a-ho, are you ‘most done?
It's Liza, will you marry me?
So clear away the track, and Let the Bullgine Run!

 

Thank you for visiting Irishrow.com - Come back again soon.